English idioms: origin, translation, Russian equivalents

In the languages ​​of the world, there are idioms. For the Russian language the word "phraseology" is more familiar.

An idiom is a combination of several words that conveys one common meaning. These words lose meaning separately.

You can not understand the meaning, if you do not know the meaning of the idiom. In addition, phraseological units give color to our statements. Therefore, they need to be memorized and used in speech.

This article will introduce English idioms with translation. And their equivalents in Russian. So.

English idioms. Weather

In Britain they do not talk about politics, religion, or family. Especially, with strangers. The only suitable topic for conversation is the weather. Therefore, a lot of English idioms - on this topic.

English idioms

Rain cats and dogs - there is a downpour. In Russian - pours like a bucket.

This English idiom appeared in the 18th century. It was introduced by the British writer J. Swift. In those days there was weak protection of sewer pipes. They broke through even from showers. All the contents poured out, including, and corpses of domestic animals: cats and dogs.

Steal one's s thunder - steal someone's idea.

This English idiom came from theaters in the 18th century. Then there was no sound equipment, and to create a sound of thunder shook the leaden balls in a bowl. The playwright J. Dennis used metal in his play. The play was rejected, but the idea of ​​metal balls from Dennis was stolen.

Then he shouted a phrase that grew into an English idiom: "They're stolen my thunder!" - They stole my thunder.

Break the ice - break the ice. The Russian version - to melt the ice (about the relationship); to get closer.

In the 19th century, the first icebreakers appeared. To get to their destination, they had to cope with the thick bark of ice. Hence the English idiom. "Breaking the ice" - that is, to make efforts to improve relations.

English idioms with translation

Get wind of smth - learn something ahead of time. In Russian, you can put it this way: "sniff", ferret out, scout.

This phrase is a comparison with how animals receive information through the sense of smell. Our younger brothers "sniff out" their kindred and enemies.

Take a rain check. Verbatim:get a rain ticket. In Russian, this phraseology means "postpone until better times"

Expression came from America in the 19th century. If a baseball match was canceled because of the rain, the fans were given "rainchek", according to which they could come to any event when they wanted.

Calm before the storm - quiet before the storm. In Russian, the expression "calm before the storm" has settled.

It happens that when there is no problem, no one will fall head over heels. And people do not even know about it.

The meaning of idioms is completely similar to what happens in the sea. Usually there is a calm before a strong storm.

Food

Couch potato. "Couch" is a "sofa", "potato" is a "potato". Such is the "man-sofa potatoes", that is, lazy and lazy.

English idioms with translation and their equivalents in Russian

Egghead-smart ass. We call them botanists, and in the US they are eggheads.

Chew the fat - vilify, sharpen the lycées. Literally: chew fat.

Animals

When pigs fly - when the pigs fly. The Russians say this: "when the cancer on the mountain whistles." That is, not soon.

Eager beaver. Literally - tense beaver. In Russian - "hard worker", a business man.

pigs

Black sheep - literally, a black sheep, and in meaning - a white crow. Indicates a person who is not like the others.

Be as busy as a bee - be as busy as a bee. In Russian - to work, rolled up his sleeves.

Money

A piece of a pie-"piece of cake," that is, share.

Be flushed with money - scatter money.

Make ends meet - to break from bread to kvass, to need.

Bring home the bacon - provide, bring home a penny.

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